Are you a Pochemuchka?

Unless you're a Russian-speaker, you probably won't know what I'm on about, but the very fact that you chose to read this blog may mean that you're a Pochemuchka anyhow.

There is no direct translation in English for the Russian word Pochemuchka, which makes me think that maybe there aren't enough of them in Britain to warrant the word.

In essence, a Pochemuchka is a person who constantly asks questions - someone who always wants to know the reason for things.

Now we've all encountered that child who, whatever your answer to their questions, will continually ask 'Why?' It doesn't matter what you say, nothing satisfies their curiosity and inquisitiveness - indeed the term Pochemuchka was inspired by a Russian children's book titled Alyosha Pochemuchka, in which the protagonist is a highly inquisitive young boy.

Now I'm not suggesting you go around as an adult irritating your peers with pointless and pestering questions, but I think having a constantly questioning mind can be a valuable trait.

People who visit my house sometimes think I'm a bit mental, as I had the word 'WHY?' drawn out on a piece if paper and posted on my wall for some time. It served to me as a reminder: to remember why I was committed to doing certain things; to remember not to accept all things without question; and to remember to always be curious!

Inquisitiveness shows that we are still open to learning, to improving and accepting that we don't know everything. But that we are willing to find out.

It is easy when we go about our daily lives to take the short-cut of never questioning things, or doing things as a matter of routine rather than for the right reasons.

'Why?' can be a powerful question in getting you back to the root of your decisions, behaviours and reactions. And when you've figured that all out, it never hurts to ask a few more questions - as we all know, knowledge is power.

Of course, as a coach, I know the power of asking exactly the right question at the right time. Getting others to question you can be the most thought-provoking thing of all. Lots of those 'AHA!' moments can come from a question you might not have thought to or have dared to ask yourself :)

Jeff Mowatt

jeffmowatt-232748

Are you a Pochemuchka?

My steet Russian allowed me to identify myself as a Perdoon

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Beth Burgess

bethburgess2-672944

Are you a Pochemuchka?

All great comments on here - thanks guys :) @Julia, I've been pronouncing it how I'd imagine it should be said, based on not much except instinct and having learnt a few languages, none of which are Russian. This may or may not be correct but i'd pronounce it "Po-chay-mooosh-ka". Any Russians in??

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Jeff Mowatt

jeffmowatt-232748

Are you a Pochemuchka?

Well I was. Renowned for it with those foolish enough to babysit. (Sigh) "He walks so slowly and asks so many questions". I guess I got out of the habit for a few decades but it came back recently when driven by injustice. I want to know why an international development agency doesn't walk what it talks. Why did it keep the lid on a human rights issue for 3 years and do nothing?

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Julia McDaid

juliamcdaid-47153

Are you a Pochemuchka?

Question for you then Beth... how do you pronounce it? ;-) I think other commentors have already said it all aside from that Heart Centered Support and Wealth Creation for Women Entrepreneurs **Autumn Offer!!** big discounts for November & December for selected new clients

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Nic Oliver

nicoliver

Are you a Pochemuchka?

Yup! I've long believed that the quality of my life depends on the quality of the questions I ask - as long as I listen well to the answers! Great blog, Beth and thanks for introducing me to a new word. Blessings, Light, Love and Peace Nic Connect - Engage - Share www.nic-oliver.com email twitter linkedinfacebook

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Alan Bowman

alanbowman-330504

@ Beth Are you a Pochemuchka?

Hi Beth As my Russian interpreter and lawyer would confirm you can now ask why, what, where and when in Russia, something not allowed for a long time. Cheers and thanks for this insight. Alan

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Katie-Ellen Hazeldine

katieellenhazeldine-186355

Are you a Pochemuchka?

Thank you for the word share Beth. This is a new one for my vocab. The big 'why's, I feel, are best taken away and reflected on and investigated independently, if the interest is sincere, that is, and not just for show. Nothing easier than to ask 'why'. (Sometimes people take pride in being a pochemuchka for its own sake; some people encourage it in their children are proof of precocious genius, when it's more like watching a terrier leaping about. New thinking arises from developing a capacity for inner stillness) Some answers need a long time to reveal themselves, assuming a great reveal is actually possible. Answers may be a matter of understanding rather than factual knowledge and understanding is a capacity that unfolds at its own pace, though if the curiosity is fierce, the mind will be munching away on the question subconsciously no doubt, pending a sudden insight. Or not. Other people shouldn't be treated as repeat push button machines for giving answers...it's off to the encyclopaedias for starters: hard copy or virtual. Sometimes too, as in, for instance, 'why should this happen to me and not someone else', there is the 'why not?'

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Anna Figiel

annafigiel-87173

Are you a Pochemuchka?

Great topic, Beth! Questioning is an art and different people react differently to having questions asked of them. Persistent questioners need to be sensitive to the effect their curiosity has on others. Too many questions and I feel I'm being badgered, interrogated, doubted, disrespected and not listened to the first time.

1 comments