The Aquatic Ape Hypothesis of Human Evolution

The Aquatic Ape Hypothesis of Human Evolution

There is something strange about us human beings, the naked apes. Ever wondered why we are generally so hairless, compared to our closest ape relatives?

Not only that, we are distinguished from our cousins by being large brained and bipedal. We cry salty tears, have sweat glands, and a layer of subcutaneous fat from birth. We require relatively large amounts of water to remain hydrated. What's more, we swim, speak and have aquiline noses. Why?

Consider our nearest relatives. If you stand a chimpanzee under a shower, it's not a pretty sight. The chimp's hair sticks out in all directions. Our hair is streamlined and flows from the top down. Gorillas hate being in the water and tend to panic and drown rather easily. There are even cases of men saving them from drowning. Strange, but true.

The explanation is our extraordinary relationship with water.

The idea that we may have had a semi-aquatic stage at a critical point in our evolution was first published by eminent marine biologist Sir Alistair Hardy in 1960. It had come to him in 1930, in a "eureka" moment. He suggested that our subcutaneous fat is a kind of blubber, like that of aquatic mammals such as seals and cetaceans.

Hardy put this idea to one side for many years, he had a serious career in the mainstream to think about, but writer and scientist Elaine Morgan heard about it from Desmond Morris. She wrote several books, including The Aquatic Ape Hypothesis, bringing it to a non-scientific audience. Eventually Morgan managed to convince some mainstream anthropologists to take the idea seriously. Nowadays it is becoming a viable alternative to the "savannah" theory of evolution - that old chestnut that we climbed down from the trees and stood upright, a bit like meerkats.

There's too much to explain in this short article, but if you are interested in learning more do look at the following links. Here is a super little biography http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/brunel/A4521539 of Elaine Morgan. Also, www.riverapes.com by Algis Kuliukas, who is finishing a Phd in Australia on Wading as a component in hominid bipedality, is a treasure trove of information and inspiration about the AAH. You will find links to Elaine Morgan's books, Kuliukas's own writings and much more on the site.


Taken from interviews with Dr Posture aka Roger Golten on PASSION for the PLANET

Roger Golten is a Hellerwork practitioner and a Shaw Method teacher. For more info see: www.zenswimming.co.uk




Chantal
Listen now to Passion for the Planet - the only radio station dedicated to improving your health, your environment and your personal development. Passion for the Planet

Anthony Haley

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The Aquatic Ape Hypothesis of Human Evolution

This is an excellent book and what is said certainly makes a lot of sense from hair, posture and even the way our noses have evolved. A great read along with The Descent of Woman.

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