The Messiah of Knowledge is Not Leading to the Promised Land.

Knowledge is cheap and the Knowledge Economy in the Information Age is not working. When should we panic? It's all very well getting caught up in the euphoria of exciting new ways to communicate with each other but how are Twitter, Facebook and Google generating new world wealth except for a few shareholders?



If indeed we are in a great economic revival driven by this so called Knowledge Economy, just what is going on? Where is the hard evidence? Is the world economy thriving in this new information age?



A glance at world economic indicators shows that Denmark leads the world at the top of the World Bank's Knowledge Economy index with the UK ranked 7th and the USA at 9th. 20th is Japan and one of my favourite countries, Slovenia, ranks a creditable 25th, above Italy at 30th. China is surprisingly ranked 89th and India 109th, behind Vietnam at 100th. Sierra Leone is last at 145th.



The rest don't make it onto the list at all. We are told that the Information Age is the one in which we now live and are warmly comforted during these current hard times by the idea that this new and exciting concept of The Knowledge Economy, a phrase attributed to Peter Drucker (it was the title of chapter twelve of a book published in 1995) is the messiah that will lead the world out of recession and into the promised land of economic recovery.



There can be no doubt that we've moved firmly into the Information Age and it's logical to think that a Knowledge-Based Economy is a natural progression from this but what does this mean, exactly? We now have more knowledge than was ever dreamed possible...and its cheap. So cheap, in fact that it's even cheaper than a previously well known maximum ROI commodity, Sand.



Sand, as we all know, is where silicon chips come from and we have an arguably limitless supply of the stuff. The way wealth has been created from this incredibly cheap commodity has been not simply by taking it and somehow magically waving a wand to convert it into chip technology but by using our brains to think about how it can be developed and utilised to create entirely new whizzy things like computers, mobile phones and all the electronic gadgetry that makes up our modern world. Like sand, knowledge is now very, very cheap. It's accessible by billions of us but, unlike sand, we don't even have to pay the shipping cost and we don't even have to have the massive investment in research, plant and equipment essential for chip technology.



But we do have to convert this plethora of knowledge into stuff that will add value in the same way that sand converts to silicon that converts to electronic consumables. It's all fine and dandy that courtesy of Tim Berners-Lee all this knowledge is freely available and we can communicate it all within a seamless network at almost zero cost, so why is the world economy still in the state it is? We can't surely keep on blaming the banks; well, in the great scheme of things, anyway....



We have this massive amazing unlimited resource, Knowledge. We have the means to distribute it around the world at extremely low cost. Converting it into wealth isn't happening. There must be something missing. What do you think it might be? Can you think what might be missing from the chain?



Can you please bring your thoughts to bear on this knotty problem. If you can get your head round it and pinpoint what's missing, you might just find the answer to ending all our economic woes. Worth thinking about? Phil Shepherd GOOISOFT Customised Software. Blending new technology with your ingenuity.


Phil Shepherd

philshepherd-99964

The Messiah of Knowledge is Not Leading to the Promised Land.

If you seriously want to know what the future holds this video will probably prove to be the most accurate predictor.

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Angus Whitton

anguswhitton-88567

The Messiah of Knowledge is Not Leading to the Promised Land.

Knowledge in itself is wealth...

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Richard J Francis

richardfrancis1-363696

I hope I don't make a stale point..

Great post - and still very relevant even after all the time elapsed. I like you Phil - thought Stuart Harris' diagram a good representation of the ingestion of input into knowledge and the output as behaviour. If we look at the issue - knowledge on it's own is useless (hence worthless in a sense). Many have commented on that for centuries so let's not go there. If we look the application of knowledge - your example of sand into microprocessors is bang-on as an example of low value input - high value output. Your further observation as an ex-Intel guy is also highly relevant - to turn low into high value - is often expensive and hard. Intel fabrication plants cost billions (the buildings themselves don't move at all in an earth tremor). Let's stick with Intel though in the context of knowledge. Intel's stock crashed in the .com boom - yet despite that massive commercial blow - Craig Barrett - the then CEO continued on a path of MASSIVE CONSISTENT SUSTAINED investment to build more chips - ready for when we exited the downturn. Analysts pounded Intel, shareholders pounded Intel, clients pounded Intel. They were my first two years there and they were rough - trust me! Let's take Intel's investment as an analogy for managing the application of knowledge in the UK. If Intel had been knowledge in the UK - there would have been electioneering concerns (if we carry on with this - will voters turn on us)? Governments would have shelved sustained investment - and maybe even have done a 'U' turn on it. If Intel had been knowledge in the UK - there would have been individual revolt from everyone (if we carry on with this - we'll not have a new car, a new telly, a 2nd holiday - bugger that)! If Intel had been knowledge in the UK - there would have been jitters from investors looking to make a quick buck (if we carry on with this - we won't make as much money as flipping a property portfolio in the next 9 months, or investing in another coffee bar chain etc). This goes some way to explaining the relative fiscal success of China, and other parts of the East in the last 1-2 decades. They had a plan for the application of knowledge WAY beyond the next corner, the next quarter, the next year. They had less knowledge (perhaps) - but used it WISELY and applied it CONSISTENTLY. Now - two years on from you writing this blog Phil - we see parts of the East now looking more and more like the west - and this may begin to implode their knowledge management discipline. Maybe it already is. Manufacturing now is creeping back to both Europe and the US. Wealthy people want their money out of China (and especially Russia). So - the UK (and economies like ours) - are now uniquely placed to learn from what we haven't done well, and exploit the upcoming cracks in the Eastern 'our leader's 25 year plan' (which you WILL be part of - OK)! In summary Phil - 2.5 years on - I think it IS leading to the promised land - and quicker than we all might imagine. What matters is - we see, listen, learn, and then action in a properly orchestrated way. UK hasn't always been good at that - but if we can capture "essence of Olympics 2012" and apply it here - we're in good shape.

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Phil Shepherd

philshepherd-99964

The Messiah of Knowledge is Not Leading to the Promised Land.

@ or are there all manner of unsung centres of excellence. They say that "good news is not news at all", so there is a strong tendency towards a lack of information about good stuff happening, which leads us, in the main, to be simply unaware of it. In a spirit of seeking enlightenment - and to tip the balance a tad the other way, here is some good news, in fact it is remarkable and brings with it the possibility of another technological revolution: Have a quick look here Alan. Then here :) It's all VERY exciting. Phil

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Phil Shepherd

philshepherd-99964

New: A country's wealth correlates with its collective knowledge

Researchers have now shown that a country's wealth correlates with its collective knowledge. In a seminal work created after a collaboration between the Centre for International Development at Harvard Kennedy and Macro Connections at MIT the research "shows the relationship between economic complexity and income per capita for 128 countries after controlling for each country's natural resource exports". (From the excellent report today at Physorg by Lisa Zyga) They have today published this important report in a free E-book called The Atlas of Economic Complexity which can be downloaded here: http://atlas.media.mit.edu/ Phil

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Phil Shepherd

philshepherd-99964

The Messiah of Knowledge is Not Leading to the Promised Land.

It's almost budget time again :) In light of much talk about "The Big Society" and the neccessity to generate growth in the economy I'm hoping that the UK Government will encourage businesses to start making better use of the digital world and to give the green light to Triple Bottom-Line business thinking by introducing new company structures. The concept of Comunity Interest Companies was great but things have moved on and the crossover between social business and full profits needs to be reviewed. How can large corporates be encouraged to offer their shareholders a Triple Bottom Line dividend I wonder? The Knowledge Economy and in particular the Digital World seems to me to be grossly misunderstood by Governments and corporations and it is only when there is a shift in thinking that best advantage can be taken of the untold opportunities that could be there for the taking. Phil Shepherd GOOISOFT Great minds think differently

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Milton Rodrigues

miltonrodrigues-136281

It is ! ... in some places.

Across the Middle-East & Sub-Saharan Africa ... In Egypt and Tunisia, Libya Bahrain The Internet and the immediate Dissipation on Information, via all the Social Media sites was in large part the enabler for the Peoples Revolutions there. Sadly, also the Cause of our £1.30 per litre of Petrol as well ! :) Milton Rodrigues Director, Surge-ITS Network Engineers, Wembley.

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Jeff Mowatt

jeffmowatt-232748

The Messiah of Knowledge is Not Leading to the Promised Land.

More on the subject of "cash generating sustainable social enteprise" - social business which limits profit distribution to protect a social objective. http://axiomnews.ca/gennews/966

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Tom Law

tomlaw-157685

The Messiah of Knowledge is Not Leading to the Promised Land.

So you've got this big blob of knowledge that's come to us from the past. So, collectively, we know it ALL already and have sucked all the goodness and profit out of it that we could. Supposedly, we've gone from a specialized society with the division of labour and all that, to a world where everyone knows everything. Supoosedly. But, the profit in knowing it all has never been demonstrated to me. Besides that, knowledge is a state of mind and not a state of being, and since it comes from our grandparents, it's really just their state of mind. I guess the theory is that we can mix up the parts and get a new perspective. We don't need grandpa's knowledge. We need new ideas. We need an age of exploration and discovery. We need humility and I imagine we need God (a higher purpose). To hell with grandpa. Besides that, there's tons and tons of hope. Since the future is yet to be, hope is all we've got, and the world is busting its seams with it. Tom Law

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Phil Shepherd

philshepherd-99964

The Messiah of Knowledge is Not Leading to the Promised Land.

@ There is almost no hope So there is some and it is those rare few "prophets" who lead without the rest knowing it and usually not, if ever, recognised as such until they are long gone.

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RealSteveHolmes Fading away soon

cvsage-38854

The Messiah of Knowledge is Not Leading to the Promised Land.

It's not a gift that most people can ever have, Phil. That's what is wrong about your question. People with the independence of mind to differ and the courage to risk it who aren't driven mad by social pressure are in any case so much vilified by the mediocre minds who can achieve nothing original but sense the ring of truth in what prophets say will, as is their natural reaction to something better than themselves - they will attempt to destroy it, with vilification, ostracisation and if necessary violence. We also see this online. And those who could say something worthwhile generally keep quiet, not out of stinginess (as you suggest) but from fear and because they see things that the ignorant mass will not accept for years to come yet. If you think you are going to isolate and teach being human you are sadly mistaken. The mass of humanity are brutish, selfish, self obsessed, greedy, ignorant, non-creative and vicious. The very idea that they could have a worthwhile revelation is ridiculous and the only kindness they ever do is for their own genes and allies or to make themselves look good. History shows this, over and over and over again. Yet every generation insists that they are better and different. They're not. They are scum, waiting to gobble up the earth with their grotesque sense of entitlement and importance. Even the victims of our foul societies are scum. There is almost no hope. Discussed along with other worthwhile topics here: New forum here.

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RealSteveHolmes Fading away soon

cvsage-38854

The Messiah of Knowledge is Not Leading to the Promised Land.

OK, Phil, having thought about it I honestly think that the level, depth, speed and subtlety of a person's insight is a function of where they are in life and does not fit a definable pattern in all people. Occasionally you come upon rare individuals who despite their arrogance and loudness nevertheless have terrific regard for the realities around them and can show the blinding insight that is part of good leadership. But most leaders are merely manipulative bullies using dark psychological arts to control others and limit insight to what they can rule over, so that's not a pattern. Some quiet souls are trembling with insight that they can barely articulate and certainly not promote into the limelight where it will be heard, but then most "shy" people are actually self-obsessed little vampires who suck attention into their suppurating psychic wounds and destroy social energy and progress - so, once again, no rule to be made up. And you can more or less guarantee that the new, yapping hoards of instant experts, gurus and consultants have neither the depth nor the complexity to offer up anything but stock answers.... If I were looking for insight I would start with those rare, self-contained individuals who show obvious affinity, modesty of demeanor and actual evidence of a coherent life. I would not be looking for miraculous breakthroughs because even the exceptional people with enough empathy to speak for others rarely deploy their gift effectively. Discussed along with other worthwhile topics here: New forum here.

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RealSteveHolmes Fading away soon

cvsage-38854

The Messiah of Knowledge is Not Leading to the Promised Land.

Knowledge is obviously not enough. There must be insight for it to be useful and insight can operate from intuition with almost no knowledge. "Knowledge" is often tautology in any case, self evident before you gather it. Discussed along with other worthwhile topics here: New forum here.

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Jeff Mowatt

jeffmowatt-232748

The Messiah of Knowledge is Not Leading to the Promised Land.

Phil, Kiva is register as a U.S. 501(c)3 non-profit, in our terms a charity. An example of the revenue generating self-sustaining social enterprise is us, People-Centered Economic Development. You missed this? An expression that's used to distinguish this kind of operation from social enterprise that is part dependent on grants, is social business. The Canadian Axiom news site has been running a series on social business and as of yesterday, we are featured in their latest article http://www.axiomnews.ca/node/965

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Stuart Harris

stuartharris-72577

The Messiah of Knowledge is Not Leading to the Promised Land.

When I started my working life our company earned its big bucks from data - 1s and 0s. These were then turned into information - price information, margin information etc. I was surrounded by ferociously brilliant journalists who knew everything. I also had passing contact with some academic philosophers, who were similarly brilliant in their way. I was also in contact with people working in psychotherapy of various form. It always puzzled me that many such clever people led chaotic, dysfunctional lives - domestic problems, weight problems, heavy drinking and smoking etc. I also knew a few - just a few - people who seemed to combine intellectual intelligence with what we now call other sorts of intelligence - emotional, physical, spiritual. So I came to the conclusion that there were different levels of information at play, that when they are constructively processed and combined, lead to the most worthwhile of all: Data combined yields information Information related in context yields knowledge Knowledge deployed in an organised way yields concrete Capabilities/Skills Capabilities/Skills put to use in a coherent, congruent purposeful way leads to Wisdom For me, anything less than Capabilities/Skills are just commodities. Richer Thinking and Writing Richer Conversation

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Phil Shepherd

philshepherd-99964

The Messiah of Knowledge is Not Leading to the Promised Land.

@you'd have to do some thing with it that most people wouldn't think of Think you've hit the nail on the head with this, Lianda. Being creative...generating something from nothing...well, perhaps not from nothing...but from an amalgam of knowledge, skill, intuition and ingenuity.

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Phil Shepherd

philshepherd-99964

The London Computational Knowledge Summit at The Royal Society

I just registered for the London Computational Knowledge Summit at The Royal Society. It's on Wed. 9th June. Steve Wolfram is Keynote! (see his TED video in this blog). You can register here: www.computationalknowledge.org.uk

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Phil Shepherd

philshepherd-99964

Why is Denmark No.1 in the World Bank's Knowledge Economy Index?

I was in Copenhagen for a long week-end recently and was VERY impressed. I was there for a quick holiday break but was particularly interested in learning about the Danish culture in relation to the fact that Denmark is at the top of the list of countries in the World Bank's Knowledge Economy Index. What is it about Denmark that puts it ahead of the rest of the world? We all now live in a Knowledge Economy and it's important to understand why certain countries are succeeding in this new world and why others are not. A view I'm slowly developing as to why Denmark is standing out in this area is around two particularly important aspects of Danish culture, Politics and Design. Politics. A system that has given long-term stability and taken much worry from the minds of its people in the form of social "safety nets", thus freeing minds to think more about creativity and innovative idea generation. Some may think the Danish system to be too soft in certain areas but trying to look entirely from a psychological and objective viewpoint in relation to the Knowledge Economy Index, it does seem to have had a strong impact on the country's economic success at a time when others are struggling. Design. This is linked directly to the first point about Danish Politics and its resultant freeing up of minds, the culture of exceptionally high quality design over many years and the development and encouragement of original thinking could not have happened without the unusually even social system. I'm trying to take an objective view and am interested only in the possible reasons behind the World Bank figures. I also noted that Danish architectural heritage goes back to Christopher IVth, born in the 14th century, so the current creative mindset has a very long pedigree indeed. This, of course has nothing to do with current political or social systems but is another strand running through Danish culture that may be adding to the mix that creates the Danish Knowledge Economy leadership. It'd be great if anyone has any ideas as to why Denmark is leading the world in this area. Maybe we should be analysing and emulating whatever it is they are doing. It might be very useful indeed towards increasing prosperity in the rest of the world. Phil Shepherd

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Dean Grimshawe

deangrimshawe-164000

The Messiah of Knowledge is Not Leading to the Promised Land.

Absolutely, as has already been said in the replies there are 2 points that create a problem here: Firstly, whoever said that 'Knowledge is Power' was incorrect. The application of knowledge is power. And secondly, Free advice is worth the price you pay! We have a generation of people who think they can get what they need for free and in some cases they can. But even once they have found the information they are surprised when it doesn't change their lives. It's because without the right professionals, the right mindset and the right conditions the knowledge alone has the potential of being worthless. My Grandad before he passed used to shake his head at all the people of today who know everything and yet know nothing. No wonder a famous Chinese philosopher believed that the quest for academic intelligence was a mental illness. By TwitterButtons.com 'The only limits are the limits that you set for yourself' Bruce Lee Nourishing the constant pursuit of excellence www.warriorcoaching.co.uk

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Daniel Roberts

danielroberts1-94335

Ever learning, never able to come to the knowledge of the truth

Reading some of the postings here made me think of a couple of things from the Bible. In Paul's day (late 1st century) he speaks about people who are "Ever learning, and never able to come to the knowledge of the truth." - It was in the contect of This know also, that in the last days perilous times shall come. 2For men shall be lovers of their own selves, covetous, boasters, proud, blasphemers, disobedient to parents, unthankful, unholy, 3Without natural affection, trucebreakers, false accusers, incontinent, fierce, despisers of those that are good, 4Traitors, heady, highminded, lovers of pleasures more than lovers of God; 5Having a form of godliness, but denying the power thereot - 1 Timothy 3 v 1-7 Could he be writing about today? Daniel Roberts Director, Incartek (ink Cartridge Technologies Ltd) www.OPUSalbums.comwww.OPUSalbums.com - print-your-own albums, digital photographic and creative papers and the best album/scrapbook software for digital photographers www.printalot.org - Paper, Albums, Software and other consumables - guaranteed quality, guaranteed service, guaranteed price - for people who print a lot. www.u-printit.co.uk - Albums and papers to make printing elegant, productive and fun www.photo4.biz - A great source for graphics software - under development www.incartek.com - an great resource for digital photographers and anybody interested in digital printing. Octopus Blogs on Wordpress: - an ever increasing wealth of ideas, tips etc fro digital photographers eBay Shop - Photo4BizOPUSalbums.com's paper, albums and software - Buy now of make offer Ecademy Club Leader - EBay Sellers Forum Ecademy Club Leader - Silver Ecademists Networks Ecademy BlackStar;++ Linked-in ++ Naymz ++ Ryze ++ Xing Plaxo ++ Twitter ++ Friendfeed Senior Consultant - Excelsis Enterprises Ltd" _ Practical help for business Pointer to: The One and only Saviour - the Lord Jesus Christ Author of "What day is Brand Freedom Day?"

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Phil Shepherd

philshepherd-99964

The Messiah of Knowledge is Not Leading to the Promised Land.

Earlier in this blog it was observed that we now have easy and cheap access to more knowledge than was ever dreamed possible and a discussion about formulae for how this might best be turned into wealth has been developing. During some research into this internet knowledge "bank" I found a TED video made in 2007 about the next 5000 days of the internet by Kevin Kelly which so far has proved to be an accurate predictor. A small part of it mentions "The internet of things" which was the subject of a video in a blog by Thomas Power. This clip goes much deeper and contains some profound and truly visionary insights. Thought it might be useful to include it here as a way to maintain perspective on the issue of just how much information is out there. It contains a fascinating comparison between the internet and the human brain and predicts how long it will be before the internet will become more powerful than us. Here's hoping you find it thought provoking. Phil

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Sam Borrett

samborrett-372470

The Messiah of Knowledge is Not Leading to the Promised Land.

Phil, what a great and thought provoking blog. All too easy it seems for knowledge to guide us to the promised land. of course what is missing in this- as you say- plethora of knowledge- is our intelligence to translate the knowledge into real value, not for us but for everyone else. The people who can do THIS big thing will not only be the leaders and inspirers to be more accurate but will also enjoy the ride in a most fulfilling way. Sam Sam Borrett Master Mentor, Entrepreneur, Facilitator Mentoring4Change Jupiter Properties Pty. Ltd. EastWest Property Investments PO Box 241 Brunswick Heads, NSW, 2483 Australia

1 comments

Phil Shepherd

philshepherd-99964

Computerised thinking gets ever closer. Is this a giant leap?

The transition or progression from raw data through knowledge, thinking, skilled action, creativity and ultimately the generation of wealth may have taken a step or two forward with this computational interface. It's certainly extremely interesting. I hesitate to use the word, but I can't think of another to express my reaction to it; awesome. Phil

1 comments

Martin Dewhurst

martin-dewhurst-30038

The Messiah of Knowledge is Not Leading to the Promised Land.

Brilliant Phil, Thanks for taking the time to dig back. Yes action is where it's at, local and international action too. In this case I base the logic upon a simple analogy that children understand. If we have one apple between two of us, what is the fairest way to share this to ensure we both are nourished? Action if born out of fear can lead us blindly into conflict, action born out of right thinking and neutral observation can lead us towards right action. There's destructive action and there's constructive action, there's individual action and collective action. My observations of the Saharawi taught me that collective action results in collective survival and social cohesion. And where there is a lack of social cohesion it is largely a result of an individualistic culture. Neither is right or wrong from my perspective, it's merely the case that there are consequences in both examples. In the collective example - high literacy, strong interdependence, low if not zero crime rate, strong social unity. In the individualistic example - illiteracy, social disparity, state dependence, high crime rate, social issues and associated costs with drugs, alcohol and violent crime. The Apex of the world no less!!! And you are 100% right, I could sit in a cave and meditate for a lifetime and shift my perspective to potentially higher plains, however, through action however misguided I may be, I learn on the ground, I learn through error and apparent failure. I learn what works and what clearly does not. The greatest learning has been "none of us are as smart as all of us" so my constant aim is to find a consistent way of tapping into the wisdom of crowds, the so called collective consciousness, the consciousness that sees Right as more sustainable than Might. Through experiential learning and action I arrive at an intersection between 2 worlds. One is the rear view mirror and other a future potential. I can't touch either so all I'm left with is the eternal now. Martin

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Jeff Mowatt

jeffmowatt-232748

The Messiah of Knowledge is Not Leading to the Promised Land.

Local action is where we come from too Phil and that was how a city in Russia, a repatriated Islamic community and institutionalised children came to be our primary targets. as we say: "P-CED advocates for the development of localized people-centered economics on a global basis." What's more difficult to get across is that rather than charity this is business which yields profit toward achieving social outcomes. My closest connection to the Commons was to correspond with the APPG on microfinance, who weren't interested in the Russian microfinance initiative. It doesn't mean I didn't try to get though. The point of putting the theoretical new paradigm in the public domain was in itself to spread knowledge for the use of anyone else in social endeavour. Is all of this not action?

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Richard White

rljwhite-20646

The Messiah of Knowledge is Not Leading to the Promised Land.

Hi Phil Nice to spend time at lunch today and I promised I would put my thoughts down We all know people who know a lot but never achieve much. Knowledge itself has not intrinsic value. The real value is the application of that knowledge to enable people to achieve their goals The issue of the information age is that there is too much information - too much stored knowledge - and much of it conflicting. The challange is to sift through and make sense of it and then deciding what is relevant and what is not.......so that people can act on it There is a growing array of knowledge management tools that exist and are evolving to cope with this challenge - for example, OpenText Best wishes Richard Get totally free online sales training at www.TheAccidentalSalesman.com Follow me on Twitter for regular sales tips

1 comments

Michael Heaney

michaelheaney-53285

Owning a Black Cab does not make me a taxi driver

Access to Information and other people's opinions is cheap but knowledge, understanding, expertise and wisdom are just as hard won as ever. Google can give you thousands or, if you are unlucky, millions of suggestions for pointers to possible answers, whatever search term you post But just as a library ticket gives one instant access to perhaps a million books - this does not immediately convey knowledge to one. One has to select which books are of importance at this time and then actually go to the bother of studying the subject; building the internal structures mind maps and cell assemblies and then through thought derive conclusions and the beginning of an understanding of the further depths, the interconnectivity and the underlying complexity of each field of study. If the subject involves practice - actually doing Painting rather than knowing about how Da Vinci or Picasso painted then there is a whole other learning curve to be climbed. The barriers to finding out have been largely eliminated - but learning and practice and acquiring mastery and understanding is not as easy as booting up and jacking into a broadband connection. There is no instant short cut to understanding. There are those who are making fortunes by providing the access, or the infrastructure. They peddle the whole myth that IT Computer systems can deliver Knowledge. But this was just a rebranding exercise when Information Technology was challenged with information overload. It was a promise that could never be delivered. Consider Fred Dibnah the steeplejack - just because one can watch a TV program and see how he knocked down a chimney does not make one able to do it. Put me side by side in an identical car to Jensen Button and he will roar off and win the race. Despite having the exact same equipment, telemetry and data feeds I will probably total myself into the tyre wall at the first bend, not because I don't have access to the all the same information - but because I lack the fingertip skill set that he will have acquired over countless hours of practice. You can read more about this The steady trajectory from utter Ignorance towards Excellence http://www.ecademy.com/node.php?id=132123 Knowledge management is not just about efficient and effective learning of new things- it's also about not completely forgetting the old, the obscure, the obsolete, the archaic and the antediluvian. Archives are the future http://www.ecademy.com/node.php?id=130041 South Utsira, North Utsira http://www.ecademy.com/node.php?id=127788 Michael Heaney Benchwhistler Associates Ltd Planned People Maintenance - Enhancing the Performance of your most important asset www.benchwhistler.com Know Better

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Martin Dewhurst

martin-dewhurst-30038

The Messiah of Knowledge is Not Leading to the Promised Land.

Hi Phil, Sam got here before me :-) self knowledge is the key. We already have wealth, it's buried within us in our capacity to love and care for each other. Self knowledge born out of self realization leads to self actualization and the life long learning process, from this emerges trust, compassion, humility, cooperation and mutuality. If humanity, through technology, were able to stand in a virtual circle, all of us, young, old, black, white, left, right, religious and agnostic we would all eventually realize that we are all alike, we already have all we need and that love is our highest common denominator. Self Knowledge Leads to the Promised Land. Martin

1 comments

Sam Borrett

samborrett-372470

ONLY one thing Missing

Phil, the ONLY think missing is that we do not know ourselves. Most people though are content to focus on everything outside like money, security, wealth, relationships,abundance, even health....all great things. But the only thing which will give us any happiness is to know what lies deep within. People are afraid to encounter their ugliness, the hurt and rage inside and are more concerned with the politics of communication rather than the intelligence of wisdom. Then we can have the trappings if we can want but we are not so attached to them. What to do? Each of us decides this don't we? Cheers Sam Sam Borrett Master Mentor, Entrepreneur, Facilitator Mentoring4Change Jupiter Properties Pty. Ltd. EastWest Property Investments PO Box 241 Brunswick Heads, NSW, 2483 Australia

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Jeff Mowatt

jeffmowatt-232748

The Messiah of Knowledge is Not Leading to the Promised Land.

Phil, our own "formula" is described in the paper I quoted from above, which has several influences from behavioural science in its bibliography. In 2006 the concept was applied to create a national strategy plan in which broadband was one of 4 components. Like microfinance, one of the other component it cannot be considered in itself a panacea where there is absence of democracy and the rule of law. Information access and hence knowledge was prohibitively expensive, community based wireless networks were illegal. http://www.p-ced.com/1/projects/ukraine/national/ Within a year, national rollout of affordable broadband access began and the social enterprise investment fund component had crossed the Atlantic by 2008, where the same argument of using funding made available from ending war in Iraq used to justify it. http://www.socialedge.org/blogs/dr-o/archive/2008/11/12/obama-promises-social-entrepreneurship-agency We've taken this through thinking to action with evidence of impact.

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Das Suman (Doctor-Da)

doctordas

The Messiah of Knowledge is Not Leading to the Promised Land.

Thanks a lot dear Phil :) @ We have this massive amazing unlimited resource, Knowledge. We have the means to distribute it around the world at extremely low cost. Converting it into wealth isn't happening. There must be something missing. What do you think it might be? Can you think what might be missing from the chain? ....deep deep rooted thoughts indeed :) I think 'most of those we have' are data(s) and not knowledge! What we are missing is 'applications' what converts 'the data' into 'knowledge'! Unfortunately we still find talents (those who know applications) in CVs! But at the same time, we 'know' those great talents who moved and moves things towards a better tomorrow had have NO CVs to impress our sufferings! On Ecademy, I was (still it happens but less) challenged by few ordinary traders because I have no CV to impress their meaningless mediocre mid-set while their CVs never impressed my dreams! In addition… we are not open enough to accept futuristic thoughts perhaps most of us are living a lived life with more materialistic garbage! I believe… human mind is like parachute, works only when it's open :) that is what we are missing otherwise what we don't have? We have everything we had… we have everything we need… we have 'the parachute' :) Doctor-Das, Suman ( Doctor-Da ) :) foodyoga ll riaa ll flip ll alterad ll twitter ll linked-in

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Robert Oosthout

robertoosthout-155636

The Messiah of Knowledge is Not Leading to the Promised Land.

It is like Graham wrote. The context isn't knowledge. It is applied knowledge. And application is a derivative of attitude. I read a nice book on this. Your Attitude Determines Your Atitude Robert Oosthout Solicitor & Mediator Call me on +31 626 902 545

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Graham Wilson

drgrahamwilson

The Messiah of Knowledge is Not Leading to the Promised Land.

Spot on, Phil. On a more mundane level, it frightens me how many people seem to think that they can put down a few words of wisdom, elaborate them with a handful of facts, save them as a pdf and then make their fortune flogging them on the internet. There's an industry grown up around helping those who can't EVEN put 400 words together to turn their vague ramblings into some order, to save them as a user-friendly file, and to promote them to lists of gullible desperados. While this is clearly the basement level of the KNOWLEDGE economy, to me it exemplifies why this whole sector is never going to be the panacea some would have us believe it is. What these people (both producers and consumers) seem to miss is that it takes SKILLS to turn knowledge into a valuable commodity and to apply those skills you need the right set of ATTITUDES. The concept that knowledge is the be-all and end-all has become so ingrained that I often find myself working with well-established and successful executives who are frightened that their knowledge is becoming out-of-date and that their status is threatened by the latest young things from Harvard or LSE who can spout the current vocabulary. It can take a lot of time and effort for them to begin to re-value the SKILLS that they have honed over a couple of decades and to see that the ATTITUDES of the new generation are not necessarily going to win them friends in the world of business. Keep up the good work! I am happy to comment, or deliver keynote sessions, on any of the topics that I post about. For media and speaking enquiries, please call me, Graham Wilson, on 07785 222380. Best wishes Behind the scenes, helping those of power see themselves, other people and situations differently grahamwilson.org - businesscoaching.org.uk - inter-faith.net - thefutureofwork.org - corporate-alumni.info

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Jeff Mowatt

jeffmowatt-232748

The Messiah of Knowledge is Not Leading to the Promised Land.

To answer this Phil, in part, I wrote my own blog to follow up on efforts I've been making locally.in the area of community economic development. At the meeting I refer to, I felt compelled to make the point that we seemed to be able to make more headway against the Russian Mafia than could be demonstrated locally. In these efforts one has to first compete for funding.. Only 6 villages would be supported in this Big Lottery based campaign. Otherwise funds made available to local government become feasibility studies from which the usual suspects reap We were not successful in our local bid, and yet the business model we conceived and described in the application resurfaced this year in the Social Enterprise Mark with lottery funding assistance to develop an d promote it. We've been describing how to convert information into wealth for 14 years now as reflected in my blog and the web page created after last weeks meeting. We'd taken this economic development approach to Russia where efforts to break into the information loop met with obstruction (FSB demand all ISPs install Sorm-2 "security" software) yet this was still able to leverage investment in a microfinance bank with the impact of creating `10.000 new businesses in the city of Tomsk. http://www.iccrimea.org/scholarly/economicdev.html What we should be doing is to take heed of those who are applying these ideas and making progress rather than those making a living from talking about doing it,

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Phil Shepherd

philshepherd-99964

The Messiah of Knowledge is Not Leading to the Promised Land.

Most of what you say is true and very interesting indeed, Jeff, but I can't agree that social media gurus are necessarily promoting a "me first" mentality. As part of the growth of the knowledge based economy, they play a very useful role in educating people in how best to utilise the technology to communicate and stay in dialogue with each other; surely a good thing in general. My point is, however, that despite all the knowledge that is now available, value is not being added and economic growth is not forthcoming. I repeat the question; what is missing? We have the knowledge readily available; what should we be doing to convert it into wealth?

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Jeff Mowatt

jeffmowatt-232748

The Messiah of Knowledge is Not Leading to the Promised Land.

Phil, This is how this is described in the P-CED founding paper: "As Alvin Toffler predicted in Power Shift, where once violence and then wealth were dominant forms of power, information is now becoming the dominant power. Those nations with the greatest freedom of information and means of transmitting it have now become the most powerful and influential, and the strongest economically. Toffler also predicted the collapse of the Soviet Union would come about due primarily to its authoritarian control and limiting of information. Unfortunately for Russian citizens, this old habit has continued for them beyond the collapse of the former Soviet Union and will at the least make an interesting case study on the survivability of a once strong nation which still remains committed to limiting and controlling information." "By going with the normal flow of free-market enterprise and the emerging replacement of monetary capital with intellectual capital as the dominant form of basic enterprise capitalization, it becomes easier to set up new companies primarily on the basis of invested intellectual capital. (See Post-Capitalist Society, by Peter Drucker). In plain English, socially responsible and forward-thinking companies can be set up quickly and cheaply--and these companies have indefinite potential for earnings and localized, targeted economic development. The initial objective is to develop model enterprises and communities, then implement successful strategies from those models into surrounding communities regionwide or nationwide, as needed." The core argument of this paper, a critique od Western capitalism was that people had become disposable in favour of wealth based on imagining numbers. In that argument you will find the conditions described which led to the economic collapse 12 years later. For me this identifies what could be possible and not necessarily what has happened since. Many NGOs now act on ICT for development, implementing telecentres in the developing world and yet, by and large the commercial world still hasn't endorsed fully the concept of enlightened self-interest. What that paper prescribed has since become part of what is now described as social enterprise and the principles of a social business model therein will be found in the Community Interest Company, B Corporations and the Social Enterprise Mark criteria. An enlightened form of capitalism has also touched many business leaders. We've had several failures ourselves and some success, notably in making the case for affordable broadband rollout in Ukraine as an empowerer of wealth and emerging democracy. A year later national scall rollout based on Nortal technology began. Last week here in our locality I attended a large meeting about broadband performance. We had the potential futures painted by BT and others but until I got up to raise a question nobody thought at all about - the potential social and financial ROI rather than just the latter. We are still dominated by a "me first" mentality, which manifests in the commercial social media guru who wants to persuade us that creating a following will increase our own wealth. As yet it's just a minority that understands that wealth for all is in all our interests.

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