Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

The Truth About Nuclear Power: Japanese Nuclear Engineer Calls for Abolition

Dear Ecademists,

Koide Hiroaki, a Japanese nuclear engineer and permanent assistant professor at Kyoto University wrote in The Truth About Nuclear Power: Japanese Nuclear Engineer Calls for Abolition what he thinks are the seven sins of nuclear power!

  1. Politics without Principle,
  2. Wealth without Work,
  3. Pleasure without Conscience,
  4. Knowledge without Character,
  5. Commerce without Morality,
  6. Science without Humanity and
  7. Worship without Sacrifice.

Koide Hiroaki began his career as a nuclear engineer forty years ago drawn to the promise of nuclear power.

Quickly he recognized the flaws in Japan's nuclear power program and emerged as among the best informed of Japan's nuclear power critic.

His cogent public critique of the nuclear village earned him an honourable form of purgatory as a permanent assistant professor at Kyoto University.

Koide would pay a price in career terms, continuing his painstaking research on radio nuclide measurement at Kyoto University's Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) in the shadows.


Until 3.11.

Since the earthquake tsunami and nuclear meltdown at Fukushima Daiichi, he has emerged as a powerful voice and a central figure in charting Japan's future energy course in the wake of disaster: in scores of well attended public lectures, in daily media consultations and interviews, in his widely read posts and in three books that have helped to redefine public consciousness and official debate.

What do you think?

Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

Please open the debate!

Have a great and prosperous time!

Best

- Lucas

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Lucas Wyrsch

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Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

Scrap nuclear power, says Japan's KanDear Readers of this Thread, Humankind has never before faced a common challenge as great as this one: managing the tension between economic growth, energy supply and planet stewardship, says Bloomberg in its introduction to the Bloomberg Businessweek Green Summit that will take place on December 4th, 2012 in Singapore. Naoto Kan, the former Prime Minister, has admitted that his office was "overwhelmed" during the Fukushima nuclear meltdown last year, and he recommended that Japan scrap all its reactors to avoid a repeat, wrote David McNeill in the Independent. He told a parliamentary committee yesterday that the bulk of the blame for the disaster lay with the nuclear lobby, which he said had acted like the nation's out-of-control military during the Second World War, with "a grip on actual political power". Mr Kan has been sharply criticised for his handling of the disaster. In the process of any transformation of this scale, there are fortunes to be made. Global investment in clean energy alone reached US$260 billion in 2011, led by Asia with US$60 billion, North America with US$40 billion and Europe with US$38 billion. The Asian Development Bank recently sold $339 million in clean-energy bonds to fund renewable and efficiency projects to secure power supplies for Asia's growing economies. The ADB was the third-biggest issuer of green bonds at the end of 2011 with $897 million after the World Bank and European Investment Bank. The bonds, often called green, climate or clean-energy bonds, can be issued by the leading development banks to fund air, water and energy projects that help fight climate change and people affected by it. All of which suggests that, while innovation will always be a market driver, clean tech has entered a new phase, that of integration and achieving scale. Solar power generation world record set in Germany where solar panels produced 22 gigawatts at midday hours on Friday and Saturday, meeting half country's electricity needs on second day - equal to 20 nuclear power stations at full capacity. What do you think?Can we save the world economy thanks to a global phase out of nuclear power? Have a great and happy day! Best, Lucas

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Lucas Wyrsch

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Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

The Pacific Ocean Is Dying: Special Report On Fukushima Nuclear CatastropheDear Ecademists, T Anthony Michael published in The Market Oracle that The Pacific Ocean Is Dying! Just prior to the Supermoon of March 18th, 2011, the world witnessed a natural and manmade disaster of epic proportions. What transpired off the coast of Honshu Island, Japan on March 11 has forever altered the planet and irremediably affected the global environment. Whereas the earthquake and tsunami proved to be truly apocalyptic events for the people of Japan, the ongoing nuclear disaster at Fukushima is proving to be cataclysmic for the entire world. Most of the world community is still unaware of the extremely profound and far-reaching effects that the Fukushima nuclear disaster has had. If the nations of the world really understood the implications of the actual 'fallout' - past, current and future - the current nuclear energy paradigm would be systematically shut down.For those of us who are in the know, it is incumbent upon each of us to disseminate the relevant information/data necessary to forever close down the nuclear power industry around the globe. More >>> Right, we have to phase out from commercial use of nuclaar power, I never said or wrote something else during the last 30 years! I wish you all a happy and prosperous Tuesday! Best, Lucas

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Lucas Wyrsch

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Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

Explosion at nuclear site in southern France kills 1, injures 4; no leaks reported - Washington PostDear Ecademists, A nuclear waste site in southern France had an explosion Monday that killed one person, seriously burned another and slightly injured three others, France's nuclear safety body said. The Nuclear Safety Authority said no radioactive leaks have been detected in the blast at 12:37 p.m. (1037 GMT, 6:37 a.m. EDT) at an oven in the Centraco nuclear site. The accident was under control within the hour, the agency said in a statement. What do you think?Are nuclear power plants save? Have a great and prosperous time! Best - Lucas Join The Swiss Business Club - Join the GuanXi Game Club - Join the Risk Consulting Club - And Join Doing Business Virtually!

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Lucas Wyrsch

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Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

Massive power outage knocks Southern Calif.'s San Onofre nuclear plant offlineDear Ecademists, How reliable are nuclear power plants? The San Onofre nuclear power plant in Southern California has shut down because of a massive power outage that's affecting millions in California, Arizona and Mexico. Charles Coleman, a spokesman for Southern California Edison, said Thursday that the plant went offline at 3:38 p.m. Pacific as it is supposed to do when there is an electrical disturbance. Authorities in San Diego are warning residents to beware of price gouging following this week's massive blackout that left more than 4 million without power. PHOTOS: Blackout leaves millions without power What do you think?How reliable are nuclear power plants? Have a great and prosperous time! Best - Lucas Join The Swiss Business Club - Join the GuanXi Game Club - Join the Risk Consulting Club - And Join Doing Business Virtually!

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Lucas Wyrsch

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Va. nuclear plant experienced 'strong' shaking in Aug. 23 quake

Va. nuclear plant experienced 'strong' shaking in Aug. 23 quake - Washinton PostDear Ecademists, Brian Vastag, journalist of the Washington Post, published on September 9, 2011 an intriguing article "Va. nuclear plant experienced 'strong' shaking in Aug. 23 quake" where he mentions that the August 23 central Virginia earthquake shook the North Anna nuclear power plant harder than it was designed to withstand, officials from Dominion Virginia Power told the Nuclear Regulatory Commission on Thursday. ABC News Technology confirmed with East Coast Earthquake: Twice What Nuclear Plant Designed to Withstand how strong actually all US nuclear power plants are at risk with only minor earth quakes of 5.8! video platformvideo managementvideo solutionsvideo player The 5.8-magnitude earthquake last month in Virginia caused about twice as much ground shaking as a nearby nuclear power plant was designed to withstand, according to a preliminary federal analysis. Parts of the North Anna Power Station in Mineral, Va., 11 miles from its epicenter, endured jolts equal to 26% of the force of gravity (0.26g) from some of the vibrations unleashed by the quake, said Scott Burnell, spokesman of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. An NRC document says the reactors' containment structure was built to withstand 12% of the force of gravity (0.12g.) Dominion, the plant's operator, says parts of the plant can handle up to 0.18g. "It's the things inside the buildings that may have been shaken more than the design called for," Burnell said, adding the buildings themselves appear to have been less affected. He said the analysis is based on a seismograph reading taken about 30 miles away by the U.S. Geological Survey. Whatever the final numbers on shaking or ground motion, the plant withstood the jolts, Burnell said, indicating there's a "great deal" of safety margin. "That margin was certainly enough for North Anna this time." Then "maybe you shouldn't rely on the margin," said Edwin Lyman at the Union of Concerned Scientists, a non-profit critical of nuclear energy. "The jury is still out," he said, on whether the plant was adequately designed. The two reactors at the North Anna plant, which began operation in 1978 and 1980, have remained closed since the Aug. 23 quake. They automatically shut down after losing off-site power. Backup diesel generators kept their cores cool until electricity was restored several hours later. Dan Stoddard, Dominion's senior vice president of operations, said Friday that initial readings from the facility's scratch plates and other monitors indicate its shaking during the quake exceeded its design, but he declined to give numbers. Dominion officials plan to brief the NRC today on those findings. Stoddard said the quake caused "no significant damage" to the facility, based on Dominion's ongoing inspections. He said there were some cosmetic cracks in concrete and floor tiles and 25 of 27 vertical casks holding spent-fuel assemblies moved up to 4.5 inches. "The plant is safe," he told reporters, adding all radiology readings have been normal. He said it will be operational again once inspections are complete. The NRC sent in an augmented inspection team that's slated to continue its work through next week. Eugene Grecheck, vice president for nuclear development for Dominion, said inspections by the company have not revealed any damage to "safety-related" structures or systems at the plant on the shores of Lake Anna, 12 miles north of the epicenter of the 5.8-magnitude earthquake, the largest in Virginia in more than a century. What do you think?Wouldn't it be better to follow the German, Italian, Japanese and Swiss nuclear phase out in order to create millions of new jobs in renewable energies rather than to expose populations at nuclear risks like we did during the last 58 years? Please feel free to comment! Best - Lucas Join The Swiss Business Club - Join the GuanXi Game Club - Join the Risk Consulting Club - And Join Doing Business Virtually!

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Lucas Wyrsch

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China Remains Atop Quarterly Renewable Energy Index

China Remains Atop Quarterly Renewable Energy Index - Renewable Energy WorldOngoing debt worries from the United States to Europe, and austerity measures that aim to drastically slash government spending in those countries, continue to impact financing of renewable energy projects. China, meanwhile, is moving ahead with its accelerated growth as renewables continue to figure prominently into its energy future. The stark differences are represented in Ernst & Young's latest quarterly global renewable energy country attractiveness indices, released this week. The index ranks countries in order of attractiveness for investment in renewable energy. According to the report, financing costs are soaring in the countries with the deepest economic troubles, while those that have been mostly spared of downturns are returning to more competitive lending. The report provides scores for 35 countries for national renewable energy markets, renewable energy infrastructures and their suitability for individual technologies. China remained atop the index. The Chinese government has said it will hold tenders for a total of two gigawatts (GW) of offshore wind projects in order to reach its target of 5 GW by 2015. According to news reports, China also solidified its move toward wind power by revising its target to generate 100 GW of on-grid wind energy by 2015, up from its previous target of 90 GW. The top 10 was rounded out by the United States, Germany, India, the U.K., Italy, France, Canada, Spain and Sweden. - Lucas Join The Swiss Business Club - Join the GuanXi Game Club - Join the Risk Consulting Club - And Join Doing Business Virtually!

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Terence O'Mahony

terenceomahony3-473485

Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

Dear Lucas I accept your view that hot water geysers are a perfect source of 'green' energy (per your comment to Risto about Island & Norway), however, Germany does not have oil or geysers. In several UK cites test bore holes are being dug to tap into geothermal but again the amount of energy to be generated is small when compared to other sources. Regards Terence O'Mahony

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Terence O'Mahony

terenceomahony3-473485

Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

Dear Lucas In Bavaria near to where I live in Austria, I see many installations of Solar 'farms' and most industrial roofs now have panels - many domestic properties, however, if you do the maths there is no way that PV/solar/wind/wave/ & even hydro (combined) can generate the shortfall from absence of Nuclear. The only realistic solution now is gas and oil (from Russia?). Regards Terence O'Mahony

1 comments

Duncan McDougall

duncanmcdougall-182712

Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

Lucas I am glad you mentioned about the geysers because I remembered something yesterday: You have argued at some length that using nuclear power = economic collapse (if I misunderstood you, now would be a good time to say so) and using alternatives = prosperity. In particular, you mentioned Iceland, which obtains virtually all its electricity from geothermal energy. Could this be the same Iceland which, about three years ago, had an economic meltdown several orders of magnitude worse than anything that happened at Chernobyl? Iceland's credit crunch was, in relation to the size of its economy, the worst anywhere yet. Is it just possible that economic recession has a bit more to do with how a government manages (or fails to manage) the economy than with how a utility company (which the government may or may not own) generates power? Duncan

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Terence O'Mahony

terenceomahony3-473485

Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

Dear Risto So that is why everyone is so interested in taking a stake in the Lybian oil ! It is close and of high quality for refining. Better buy shares in a pipeline laying company. Shame that Germany has no Mediterranean coast line (yet)., also a few mountains in the way! What about a railway company for those investments (Mr Buffett knows why). Still, there must be a third way - one that is green? Regards Terence O'Mahony

1 comments

Terence O'Mahony

terenceomahony3-473485

Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

Dear Lucas Pleased to see that the argument is back on track - Germanys action on closing nuclear power plants. But it does beg the question - How are they going to meet demand from industry and homeowners without being dependent on Russia and bankrupting themselves - can they revert to fossil fuels ?? Hydro, solar, wind, wave etc cannot match the capacity that nuclear is/was producing. What is the 'third' option? Kind regards Terence O'Mahony

2 comments

Duncan McDougall

duncanmcdougall-182712

Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

Lucas I still do not get it. So the reason why most protests in Britain are peaceful is that we only have a few nuclear power plants? I seem to recall there were some violent protests in Greece quite recently - can somebody tell me how many nuclear reactors they've got, or does that not count?

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Duncan McDougall

duncanmcdougall-182712

Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

Is it just me or are we getting away from the subject a bit? Seems like a repeat of what I mentioned before: 'If event A happens, then B happens, it follows that A caused B somehow'. So a peaceful protest in France (I'm assuming it was peaceful?) acted as the trigger for somebody trashing a mobile phone shop in England four months later. . . ? Sorry, but I am not convinced.

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Chris Haycox

chrishaycox-660254

Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

I think his observations of nuclear power being about "Commerce without Morality", and "Science without Humanity" hit the nail right on the head. It's amazing to me that more people haven't been evacuated from the area. --- Metrofax internet fax http://www.metrofax.com/

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Duncan McDougall

duncanmcdougall-182712

Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

Lucas Very good, several thousand people have held a demo about something they do not like (without too much trouble being caused). This proves what exactly? A few years ago we had a big march in London, about 500,000 people turned out to tell the government of the day not to ban hunting. No problems, no violence, no arrests and no change in government policy either. A couple of years after that, we had another big march in London, about the same number of people only this time they were shouting 'Stop the War'. No problems, a bit of pushing and shoving (mostly sorted out by the stewards organising the march), a handful of arrests and no change in policy that time either. In a democracy people should be allowed to express their opinions on government policy peacefully and any attempt to stop it is deplorable. But this does not mean that the people waving the placards are automatically right or that they should be allowed to tell everyone else what to do. In the end, they weren't elected and they cannot speak for anyone but themselves.

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Duncan McDougall

duncanmcdougall-182712

Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

Right, now I get it. In Britain a couple of weeks ago we had some particularly unpleasant civil disturbances. These have been put down to a whole range of phenomena ranging from the widespread use of Facebook, to the invasion of Iraq, to the killing of a man by armed police. In actual fact, the throwing of petrol bombs and trashing of consumer goods shops was down to the use of nuclear power, and if we all installed solar panels we would also get rid of racial prejudice and unemployment . . . Am I the only person out here who is having trouble buying into this? What I am a bit concerned with is the idea, expressed right from the off, that one particular technology or application thereof is 'sinful'. That being the case, presumably all the above events are God's judgement on us for daring to do what we have done. If that's true I think I have just been handed my first solid reason for becoming an atheist. Duncan

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Lucas Wyrsch

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Trains That Run on the Wind! It is what consumers want!

Trains That Run Like, and on, the WindDear Ecademists, Erik Kirschbaum from REUTERS wrote in the New York Times about Trains That Run Like, and on, the Wind that caught my attention! He starts his article: "It will not be easy to run a national railroad on renewable energy like wind, hydro and solar power, but that is what Deutsche Bahn of Germany aims to do, for one simple reason: It is what consumers want." and continues Deutsche Bahn wants to raise the percentage of wind, hydro and solar energy to 28 percent in 2014 and to become carbon-free by 2050 — targets that exceed the German government's already ambitious national goals. On the other hand, Kan, the Japanese PM, called last month for phasing out atomic power. The bill requires utilities to buy electricity generated by geothermal, solar and wind sources at above-market rates to stimulate investment in renewable energy, which accounts for 9 percent of Japan's power supply. What do you think?Can Japan and Germany succeed in their goal to live without nuclear energy? Thank you for your feedback! Best - Lucas Join The Swiss Business Club - Join the GuanXi Game Club - Join the Risk Consulting Club - And Join Doing Business Virtually!

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Christopher Bird

christopherbird-108260

Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

Nuclear power is the only alternative for the moment. The world needs a space race type competition to find an alternative. To enable this to happen vested interests must be decapitated to prevent progress. This won't be easy such groups are very powerful nevertheless I cannot help thinking no electricity will lead to very serious social unrest. Recent UK riots will look nothing in comparison. Christopher Bird

2 comments

Gareth Kane

garethkane-119606

Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

You might be interested in this debate on nuclear energy between myself and Dame Sue Ions in the latest E&T magazine. I think I have blindsided her by (deliberately) not mentioning Fukushima... G Gareth Kane terra infirma ltd - environmental and sustainability consultants Read my new book: The Green Executive Follow me on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn

1 comments

Duncan McDougall

duncanmcdougall-182712

Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

Lucas Sorry if I do not quite buy this one. It is an example of a well known form of logic: 'If A happens, then B happens, it follows that A must have caused B' I live in the UK which is the only country in Europe where vehicles drive on the left. It also has the lowest death rate from traffic accidents, per head of population, of any European country. Do we therefore assume that driving on the left must be safer? Incidentally, in this safe driving environment we're writing off around 2200 human lives every year and accepting that ten times that number will suffer crippling injuries. I would guess that this is at least ten times worse than the body count caused by generating all forms of energy (anyone who can put me straight on this please do so). Yet it is accepted - and the risk of death or crippling injury is perceived to be slight regardless of the real numbers. I mention this because a lot of the debate on nuclear power, like that on a number of other issues (GM crops spring to mind as a classic) pivots round perception first and facts second if at all. I would suggest that it is difficult enough to make sound decisions based on facts - if we are trying to decide on perceptions, we do not have a hope in hell! Duncan

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Risto Lahti

ristolahti-271076

Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

Dear Lucas, This is no doubt a very complicated matter. The PRC obviously cannot serve as an example: when you start at zero even a modest growth appears significant - percentagewise. I admit that China´s growth rates in the past few years have been quite amazing. However, that growth takes place in a few handpicked regions only. If you travel the countryside you see very little, if any, development. What you see is the price of the development in those exclusive regions: a pollution and misuse of natural resources not comparable with any other place in the world. The environmental sins committed in China during the last 60 years can never be neutralised. The latest big one being the Three Gorges project. I´d not like to see today´s Europe with large areas inhabitable for decades, if not centuries, to come. Btw. Daya Bay has been supplying a substantial part of electricity used in Hong Kong for a long time already. As to the economic growth in Europe one must take into account that the continent has been a very close market place for decades, i.e. countries with no nuclear energy plants have been part of a larger entity and "co-enjoyed" the development in countries producing cheap (at the time) energy. An extreme example is Portugal. The entire industrial/economic structure of that country cannot cope with today´s demands and remains (as it has been since the 1960´s) at the mercy of other economies for a long long time. They are now trying to build up wind and solar energy but it will take time. As I see it, without nuclear energy in the last 50 years Europe would not have been able to develop the technology (hightech) necessary for exploiting the sources of renewable energy. The capital for such research would not have been available. It has been an era enabling a never before seen growth in wealth and well-being. Therefore, while I am looking forward to seeing ways found to produce energy with less dangerous means, I cannot, at the same time, condemn the past. Germany has traditionally been a country with high prices for electricity. Now with those 7 (8?) nuclear plants shut down Germany will have to buy more electricity from abroad, for a significant part via European Energy Exchange. And that will drive the electricity price up in all countries in Europe: the Germans are used to pay high prices so the others will have to follow or try to use less energy, i.e. generally consume less. It is a free market after all. I only hope that the coming winter will not bee extremely cold... An interesting topic indeed. Regards, Risto

1 comments

Howard Wright

howardwright-119366

Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

"Why should economies waste money on fossil or nuclear fuel if we can have our energy for free?" But it isn't free. Wind and geothermal have massive set-up costs.

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Howard Wright

howardwright-119366

Long Live Cheap Energy!

I find it rather odd to look at nuclear energy as being sinful, but perhaps that is because I am not afraid of it. Albert commented above that nuclear energy was a quick fix. I cannot believe that anyone could say such a thing. Nuclear energy was a fantastically difficult and expensive technology to develop, coming out of scientists' work to understand the atom. Whether one considers it to be economically cheap or expensive, I can't see that there is anything wrong with trying to develop an energy supply which provides us with plenty of electricity cheaply and cleanly. What I really look forward to is nuclear fusion reactors (as opposed to the current fission reactors) providing us with virtually limitless amounts of energy. All without any nasty radioactive materials. Howard

1 comments

Gordon Wheaton

gordonwheaton-294525

Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

Good blog Lucas. Look forward to keeping an eye on it Regards Gordon

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Risto Lahti

ristolahti-271076

Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

Just wondering how would the world look like today if there had never been any nuclear power plants built! Risto

1 comments

Adam Gardiner

adamgardiner-193644

Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

Let's not forget that almost all our energy sources ultimately derive from hydrogen fusion in the sun - nuclear energy if you will. The Earth receives a super abundance of this energy (bestowed on the righteous and unrighteous alike) which, along with wind, wave, geothermal, hydro and tidal power, is available for clean capture and or conversion to heated water or electricity. Hydrocarbons should be preserved for use as feedstock for manufacturing plastics, pharmeceuticals etc as it is a finite and polluting resource too valuable to waste on people movers and the like. Shifting to non-nuclear renewables takes time of course but for the sake of future generations I would recommend the more quicky the better.

2 comments

N Bhashyam

dr-nbhashyam-263898

Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

Development without morality and unbridled focus on non;eco friendly way of life N Bhashyam

0 comments

Zeina Shbaklo

zeinashbaklo-490068

Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

Dear Lucas , Thank you for your blog ... What Koide Hiroaki has described as seven sins are very true and I think he lived the crisis Nuclear power is against humanity , science with no consious It should be abandoned ... Have a great time Zeina Shbaklo http://www.entrepreneur16.com/

1 comments

Nick Dewey

nicholasdewey-97331

Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

The energy companies have been a boon to society as well as detrimental to the planet. The householder, so long as he paid his bills, was removed from the energy production process completely. Man didn't have to walk into the woods with an axe and saw to get enough wood to keep the fire lit. Instead the coal man delivered the coal, the gas company delivered the gas and the electricity company pumped electrical energy into the house. This was great. It meant that humans could focus their attention on their careers and families and less on the effort of stockpiling wood for the winter. But as it took us out of the energy cycle, we lost our connection to energy, our own place in the cycle. The old mindset of "its up to THEM" (the companies or boards that run the energy) is still with us and that has to change dramatically for the world to get better. A workable hypothesis would be that its this "its up to other people" attitude that has held us back. We need to as energy consumers, find ways to make energy, to collect and store energy, to become less reliant in the grid, after all how long historically have humans lived on the "grid"? Historically for a very short period of time. Long lost skills and mind sets will have to return. The ancient knowledge that we all have a part to play in the energy cycle needs to return, but with the benefits of enlightened science and technology on our side. Also, there is an economic imperative here. Who on earth doesn't want to pay less bills? If you consider yourself a business person, why not consider energy in a business like way? Think about the costs of running your current boiler. Would a solar or wood pellet boiler be better in the long run? What about your electricity needs. Could you provide supplemental energy through your own small scale power plant for wind or solar energy? How about food preservation and storage. Would a home made solar dehydrator work better for you then your fridge or freezer for the fruit and vegetables that you buy in? Bring yourself back into the energy cycle! Make choices that are financially good for you and for your family as well as reducing your carbon footprint. I do believe that it is up to the individuals to make this work. Do you any any hobbies? That's great if you do, but why not change them to making solar panels, building wind generators and numerous other "green" devices. Financially its worth it in the long run. And if you ARE getting on a bit, think about the beautiful green legacies that you could leave in your Will. Nick Dutch Tarot Entertainer Twitter || Occult Videos || Tarot Reading VideosII Triond Blog Nick Dutch Tarot Reader in Oxfordshire | Promote Your Page Too

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Terence O'Mahony

terenceomahony3-473485

Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

Post-nuclear Let the world move on - Now we know what the implications of nuclear fission is, surely someone has a 'next generation' method of generating electrical power, that is (more) cost efficient and does not involve upsetting the cows/local residents/ risking roof collapse or waiting for a wave/wind? Any ideas? Terence O'Mahony

1 comments

Paul Wakefield

paulwakefield-258648

Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

No one is prepared to reconise the real underlying problem! Population!

2 comments

Duncan McDougall

duncanmcdougall-182712

Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

Just out of interest: How many of the thousands killed and maimed in that earthquake and tsunami were harmed by releases from a nuclear power plant that had not been designed to withstand either? (I think the answer is still 'none', but if somebody's got some real data on the subject I can stand being put right). Where exactly does nuclear power fit into the seven sins? I would have said that international banking is a much closer match to at least five of them. Duncan McDougall Reading, Berkshire

1 comments

Stan Broadhurst

stanbroadhurst-134242

Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

It is interesting to note that we may so easily all think forward to the generations that follow..pray a little...denounce others for their sins ... & then Drive daily... leave things switched on .... eat & drink to excess .... whilst announcing the sins of people that attempted to harness a god given energy form that seemed to be a correct solution at the time...... Who was it I wonder that we should blame for The Steam engine ..the IC engine & of course the light bulb ??? Best to all Stanb

1 comments

Eric Sutherland

ericsutherland1-131530

Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

Hi Lucas, There is just one sin that's having it and not being able to re-cycle the waste. Regards Eric Sutherland T/A Trog Associates Ltd View Storefront View 20% of each book Business Networking on ecademy Marketplace Author and Publisher Services Q & A on my Blog Skype Id: eric.sutherland1 Know Me for the knowledge I have in doing Business Process Analysis and Business and Technical Writing Like Me because I am willing to share my knowledge Follow Me so I can help you to be better at using my knowledge

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Albert Wm Gosnall#1

albertwmgosnall-42650

Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

The quick fix nuclear solution was never going to be a safe solution to the worlds growing energy crisis... it emerged from a process that produced the first ever nuclear bombs..with the power to destroy whole cities at a stroke..it came with seven deadly sins and they have not reduced with the advancing knowledge of science which so far has not found a solution to the manifest dangers of nuclear energy. In the early 1970's I learnt that it takes approximatly 20 years to develop an alternative energy supply. Since then, we have seen science dabble at harnessing Solar, Wind and Wave power as alternatives but we are still some 40 years later far from finding a safe alternative to what we adopted as a quick fix. Like Marc, this ancient one is troubled about what the future holds for my grand-children and great-grand-children and those of planet earth yet to come. I pray daily that science and engineers can find a safe alternative...as well as an effective process to neutralise nuclear waste. Albert Wm. Gosnall

1 comments

Marc Shaffer

marcshaffer-273453

Which are the seven sins of nuclear power?

Nuclear power came along at a time when Man was looking for cheaper, less polluting power sources that were scalable to meet demand. Anytime humans rush to a quick or cheap fix, they cause themselves, and others, harm. There is no question that the world is running out of power sources as human population continues to foolishly expand... Maybe the solution is to start up some Govt projects, like they did here long ago, and build adequate alternative power sources? Is that an alien concept? Population grows, finance goes awry, unemployment is rampant everywhere, the World needs something to focus on. How about becoming power independent for the next 100 years? Non-nuclear of course... I have reached a point in my life where as long as it all holds together a few more years, I am thrilled. But, I do feel sorry for the younger generations coming up. They have no clue what lies in front of them. Sad what previous generations have done to the Earth because they did not know. Sincerely; US DataVault, Inc. Marc H. Shaffer CEO Snail Mail: Box 33, Nashville, TN 37202-0033 Email: mhs@usdatavault.com URL: http://www.usdatavault.com Telephone: Sales: (615) 364-9442 Office: (615) 596-4898 Fax: (615) 523-4898 Your Virtual Safe Deposit Box

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