Will Marie Colvin's death change the history of Syria?



Marie Colvin was one of the best known war journalists in her profession and was certainly not afraid of putting herself in harms way in order to get close to and gather real intelligence about conflicts around the world.

She lost an eye in Sri Lanka some years ago and suffered post traumatic stress disorder following that too. This morning she lost her life in the bombardment of Homs in Syria. It's suggested that a makeshift media centre there was targeted specifically. Other journalists were injured and a french photographer, Remi Ochlik, was also killed.

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Marie Colvin reminds us of the risks that some journalists and reporters take in order to bring information to us from the worlds troubled hotspots and all of her colleagues and friends must be deeply shocked by the events leading up to her death. The prime minister paid tribute to her in Prime Ministers Questions today.

We need people like Marie Colvin, she's been an inspiration to many and a more courageous and brave person would be hard to find.

I hope that her death will become a rallying point for change in Syria and bring the world to the realisation of what is genuinely happening to the lives of the country's citizens.

William Buist
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Mick Say

micksay

Will Marie Colvin's death?

We may now see some action against the Syrian regime from the European and US governments, any innocent death is unacceptable, but this tragedy - crime, I think will not go unpunished.. Mick

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Martin Dewhurst

martin-dewhurst-30038

Will Marie Colvin's death change the history of Syria?

Will Marie Colvin's death change the history of Syria? Marie Calvin has added to the history of Syria. Through her desire to stand with the people of syria and report the actuality on the ground, she has immortalised herself into the popular culture of the country. To some she will be an enemy to the state (the controlling regime) to others she is a heroine of the oppressed (the people). The history of Syria is being written every day, with every bomb, missile and life lost. During the building and subsequent destruction of Gdem Izik in the desert of Western Sahara I spoke daily with the BBC in order to get the word of my friends out to the people in the UK and beyond. I was later told that reporting was restricted, not just because foreign journalists were banned from the region, but also because of political restrictions surrounding the on-going 37 year old dispute between the indigenous Sahrawi people and the invading government of Morocco. I connected with journalists from Spain who were present in the camp, with Sahrawi citizens who were in Layoune and Dakhla, their accounts were graphic and heart wrenching. The observation is for me at least, people like Marie Colvin, people who put their lives on the line to report the truth of what goes on around the world, they represent the truth of a situation so that people like us can see what's really going through the sandstorm of propaganda. I still believe to this day that someone with the presence of Fergal Keane or John Simpson could blow a hole in the Moroccan occupation of Western Sahara wide enough for the people to determine their own future. However, given the amount of armed struggle in the world today and the underpinning politics that fuels it, I can see why old conflicts are superseded by new ones. Never the less, journalists who risk their lives to report the truth from the ground, these are truly brave people and long may their selfless actions inspire conscious change in our collective response to oppression in all its forms.

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Jeff Mowatt

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Will Marie Colvin's death change the history of Syria?

And where better to denand change than from the US Senate Committee on Foreign Relations, who have already received the call to fund love and respect instead of ordnance "We are grossly underfunded in favor of missiles, bombs, and ordnance, which is about 100% backwards. Now, with even the US Pentagon stating that they've learned their lesson in Iraq and realize (so says top US general in Iraq ten days or so ago) that winning hearts and minds is the best option, I and others shall continue to think positive and look for aid budgets and funding spigots to be opened much more for people and NGOs in silos, foxholes and trenches, insisting on better than ordnance, and who understand things and how to fix them. We can do that. We can even do it cost-effectively and with far better efficiency than the ordnance route. Welcome to our brave new world. Except it's not so new: learn to love and respect each other first, especially the weakest, most defenseless, most voiceless among us, then figure out the rest. There aren't other more important things to do first. This message has been around for at least two thousand years. How difficult is it for us to understand?" There's just a handful of people who support that

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Julia McDaid

juliamcdaid-47153

Will Marie Colvin's death change the history of Syria?

Marie was indeed a brave and courageous woman, and an inspiration. Love your comment Alan that the truth needs to be told. There stands a woman of integrity, compassion and strength. Personally I doubt her loss will impact the crisis directly, to the locals it is "just another life lost" when there are hundreds being killed, though the effect of it being reported widely can raise the awareness of what is going on and thus the world demand for change, so hopefully the ripple will create demand for positive change from around the world.

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Alan Stevens

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Will Marie Colvin's death change the history of Syria?

I heard this tragic news on CNN here in Beijing, where I'm on a speaking tour. State Chinese TV, a supporter of the Syrian government, covered it as one of their lead stories. I knew Marie. She was one of the bravest of the brave. There are many reporters who place themselves in the front line to let us know what is really going on. Marie was exceptional in her complete disregard for her own safety in order to get a story out. She was an example to us all, journalists or not, that the truth needs to be told, whatever the risks. This is the complete opposite of the reprehensible behaviour revealed in the Leveson enquiry, and demonstrates that there are still noble journalists around. The death of a single reporter, however brave, shouldn't rank higher than anyone else killed in the Syrian conflict. Yet it does, partly because the reporting by her friends in the media is so powerful. We shouldn't forget the French photographer Remi Ochlik, killed in the same bombardment, or another reporter I know well, Edith Bouvier of Le Figaro, who was seriously injured alongside Marie and Remi. Sunday Times photographer Paul Conroy was also badly hurt. There seems little doubt that the makeshift media centre in Homs was targeted. Everyone knew where it was. After the house was hit, rockets were fired into the garden as journalists tried to flee. There have also been deaths among the community of citizen journalists who have been uploading videos to YouTube and reports to Facebook. The regime is trying to stop news getting out. Will it make a difference Syria? I hope so. Best wishes Alan

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Jeff Mowatt

jeffmowatt-232748

Will Marie Colvin's death change the history of Syria?

Did the death of a Russian reporter change Chechnya ? In the absence of democratic governance it's often unlikely that a death brings change.

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Carolyn Williams

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RIP Marie Colvin

I was watching her only last night give her courageous account of how murderously Homs and it's residents were being flattened. What an incredibly brave Woman. I've no doubt this will have an impact on World opinion.

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Stuart Harris

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Will Marie Colvin's death change the trashing of journalists?

It's a sad but timely reminder to the public, and to journalists, that the profession isn't just about getting any old story to titillate the punters.

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Martin Dewhurst

martin-dewhurst-30038

Will Marie Colvin's death change the history of Syria?

An often overlooked fact is where the Arab Spring began ... Noam Chomsky argues that the Arab Spring did not begin in Tunisia with the self-immolation of a market-seller, but instead can be traced back to the massive protest camp which appeared in Western Sahara last October. The camp at Gdeim Izik lasted for a month and attracted thousands of Sahawari protesters from across the territory. UN estimates based on satellite imagery suggest that at its height the camp contained around 6,600 tents. Like the later demonstrators in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya and Syria, the people at Gdeim Izik were protesting against unemployment, high food prices and political disenfranchisement. But they were also protesting against the ongoing Moroccan occupation of their country, which began in 1976 when the Spanish colonizers departed. Full article here. My belief William is that Syria will overcome this and the people will thrive beyond this final onslaught of tyranny. I believe this simply from the determination I've met in Western Sahara, their victory is not one of force, it's one of morality, something no amount of force can erase. Will Marie Colvin's death change the history of Syria? If I were Syrian, if my home was being bombarded by my own government troops, if everyone I knew had lost loved ones, homes and liberty, then Marie Colvin's death would merely spur me on to seek justice and freedom for my people.

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Stephen Harvard Davis

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Will Marie Colvin's death change the history of Syria?

I do hope so. In reality, however, her death is one more amongst thousands of Syrians but perhaps hers is a name that we can recognise or associate with. Without doubt she was a brave woman, caring and wanting to tell her story but many journalists have been killed "in action" and never made a difference to the end result. Besides Marie subscribed to the journalist's mantra that it was her job "to deliver the news and NOT to become it" At times like this I remind myself of Stalin's statement which is a truth...though chilling. "A single death is a tragedy, thousands is a statistic" I wonder if Syria, like Lebanon, Iraq and Egypt will just end up being a statistic

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Laurence Lowne

donny88-24613

I was just reading more about this remarkable lady

to borrow a word from Daniel Priestley. A quite extraordinary person, and even more reason to keep our press free of Government legislation. Laurence

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Roy Bretton

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Will Marie Colvin's death change the history of Syria?

I read about Marie Colvin's death on the BBC news website very sorry to hear this. Amazing the risks that journalists take to bring us all the news around the world. I like your last paragraph William "I hope that her death will become a rallying point for change in Syria and bring the world to the realisation of what is genuinely happening to the lives of the country's citizens". I hope so too!

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Phillip Khan-Panni

PKP

Will Marie Colvin's death change the history of Syria?

It's certainly a possibility. The death of a fruit seller sparked the wave of Arab Spring upheavals. Let's hope the killing of this lady will generate a surge of revulsion against a regime that wantonly slaughters its own citizens and may be responsible for attacking foreigners like her, just because they are reporting the truth about the atrocities in Syria. PKP

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